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March 28 2017

13:48

TV Upfronts Are Here To Stay: Videology’s Jamboretz

VIEQUES, PR — As the technology used for trading display ads programmatically has made in-roads in to digital video, many in the industry also expect the same thing to happen in good ‘ol television.

But hold your horses. Whilst many tech vendors are trying to usher a tradable marketplace economy in to television ad buying, the current system – in which 90% of US TV ad dollars are actually agreed way before transmission – is not going away any time soon, according to one video ad-tech exec.

“Do the ‘upfronts’ continue in the television world?,” asks Videology chief revenue officer Ryan Jamboretz, in this recorded panel interview with Beet.TV. “The whole balance of the TV content system works off the back of futures.

“Upfronts play a very fundamental world in how a scarce market trades. When you have a scarce asset that people need, they are willing to pay for a futures contract to take some of it off the market.”

The 2017 US Upfronts and NewFronts season, in which TV networks and digital publishers tout their upcoming content roster in a bid to secure ad spending, began early in March and is set to continue through to mid-May; here is the calendar.

And Jamboretz thinks the whole construct remains critical. The opinion represents a maturation of the view in video ad-land, where many vendors, early on, had enthusiastically believed they could make the same in-roads in TV as they are in video.

eMarketer forecasts 69% of US digital video display ads will be transacted programmatically in 2017. But the proportion remains only a fraction for traditional TV.

There is one good reason for that – most of TV is still broadcast over analogue or otherwise linear channels, with little opportunity to customise ads. Even if that is overcome, as more internet TV boxes are plugged in, vendors are coming to realise, that doesn’t mean TV networks will consent to their intrinsic ad sales model being changed under their feet.

“If you are a retailer and you need to advertise on Thanksgiving Day weekend, or if you are a media seller and you want to take 30%, 40% or 50% of your inventory and sell it at the upfront of the year so that you can fund content… that’s not just a nice-to-have, that’s a must-have,” Jamboretz added.

This interview with conducted by MediaLink managing director Matt Spiegel.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

11:12

Rogers Dissects TV Audience Declines And The Challenges Of Better Audience Targeting

With his multi-decade background at NBC, CNBC and TiVo, Tom Rogers knows a bit about television audiences. Given continued viewing declines, he believes the only way for broadcast and cable networks to maintain decent pricing is personalized ads with measurable business outcomes for advertisers.

“I really don’t see any other answer given this confluence of trends,” Rogers told the audience at the recent Beet.TV Leadership Summit titled Outcomes, presented by video marketing technology provider Eyeview. In a one-on-one interview conducted by Joanna O’Connell, Chief Marketing Officer at MediaMath, Rogers referred more than once to a “true crisis in traditional linear TV viewing.”

While the viewing decline has been happening for about 25 years, Rogers thinks it’s coming to an inflection point. A major contributing factor is the continued rise and popularity of non-ad-supported programming. Hours of YouTube viewing  “is just about to hit a level that exceeds all global traditional linear TV viewing,” said Rogers, who is Executive Chairman of WinView Games and Chairman & CEO of TRget Media.

However, the plethora of data and technology providers that cater to one segment or other of the audience targeting and measurement business doesn’t make things easier for advertisers and agencies, according to Rogers. Which leads some advertisers to throw up their hands in frustration and cede that ground to their agencies.

“To be frank about it, the agencies are for the most part not the people with the greatest incentives in the world to kind of drive a more cohesive integrated simple approach to this,” Rogers said. “They kind of thrive on that complexity because it makes it more necessary for advertisers and brands to rely on them.”

On the TV sales side, as better targeting and addressability drive more efficiency and ROI, waste is removed but most likely less money will change hands. “And with less spending, those particular players in the equation have a harder time seeing how they win,” he added.

Rogers likened consumers chasing skinny bundles and other alternatives to watch their favorite programs to the dynamic between a wealthy husband and a younger wife. Asked if she would still love him if he lost all his money, her response was: “Of course honey I would still love you, but I would miss you very dearly.”

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

10:59

What Makes Great Marketing, By MediaMath’s O’Connell

VIEUQES, PR — A lot of people will give you a lot of different answers about how marketing should work. For Joanna O’Connell, it comes down to valuable conversations.

In this video interview with Beet.TV, the marketing analyst turned marketing chief gives Beet.TV her prescription for advertising effectiveness.

“How do you help a marketer or an agency create conversations at scale with their best prospects and customers?,” she asks. “That’s what great marketing should be about … great marketing should enable a marketer and a consumer to connect in a way that’s providing value to both of them.

“The way in which you do that is a really strong understanding of data, an enrichment of data sets with additional sets of data that have proven value. You need to do that at a core.”

O’Connell spent three years advising marketers as a Forrester analyst before building out AdExchanger‘s research and analysis capability, and then joining MediaMath, which offers technology including a demand-side platform to help advertisers buy across channels.

Fresh from rolling out a suite of tools Down Under, MediaMath also just partnered with Zirca Digital Solutions to set up shop in India, country number 42 for the outfit.

Amid expansion, O’Connell retains her opinion on what makes the business tick.

“To make the experience great, you need to be able to understand, in that moment, what is the right thing to do – that takes holistic decisioning,” she says. “You need to be able to measure against true business outcomes … and you need to have a great creative experience.”

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

10:42

Adobe’s Combined Ad Cloud Tackles User Experience

VIEQUES, PR — The latest cloud in Adobe’s sky is advertising, after the software giant last week launched Adobe Advertising Cloud, combining its Media Optimizer tool with its TubeMogul acquisition.

The acquisition gives Adobe chops in the fast-growing world of video advertising. But what is the watch word for the company as it helps publishers and advertisers reach consumers?

“So often we get enamoured with the technology and the services behind a lot of this,” says Adobe advanced advertising head Art Mimnaugh, speaking in this video interview with Beet.TV.

“But, at the end of the day, we have to deliver a robust a robust experience for the consumer to help drive an engaging experience for the.

“We’re looking at reducing the fiction around authentication – a lot’s happening with making sure that consumers are able to to access the content that they want, not have to go through a lot of different hoops or remember their password.”

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

March 27 2017

15:26

Alphonso Brings Real-Time To TV Attribution: CEO Chordia

VIEQUES, PR — Of all the ad-tech vendors promising to light up video opportunities, Alphonso is one of the lesser-known.

But the three-year-old company says it is has some handy tricks up its sleeve to help marketers plan and figure out the effectiveness of ad spending across TV and video platforms.

Alphonso‘s offering brings the ability to retarget consumers with ads on digital devices based on TV-viewing cues.

It does that using audio content recognition build in to devices in its footprint, including smart TVs, mobile phones and set-top boxes.

“We have about 40m devices – we capture real-time viewership data on who’s watching what shows, what ads, some portion of OTT content, all of that,” says CEO Ashish Chordia in this video interview with Beet.TV.

The big idea is to help ad buyers harmonize the “frequency” metric – the vital number that determines how many times a viewer has seen an ad – across video screens, so that they are neither under- nor over-buying exposures in the new, multi-screen universe.

“Closed-loop attribution has been done for some time, with set-top box data and by customer polls; people manually doing these things with a lot of research folks and data science people thrown in,” Chordia adds. “The new ways to measure TV (is) on a closed-loop basis on a fully automated basis.”

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

15:12
A young inventor's plan to recycle Styrofoam | Ashton Cofer
From packing peanuts to disposable coffee cups, each year the US alone produces some two billion pounds of Styrofoam -- none of which can be recycled. Frustrated by this waste of resources and landfill space, Ashton Cofer and his science fair teammates developed a heating treatment to break down used Styrofoam into something useful. Check out their original design, which won the Scientific American Innovator Award from Google Science Fair.
15:02

Mad Men Creator Weiner Deconstructs TV Biz, Ad Load vs. Sponsorship Models and the Impact of Amazon and Netflix

Matthew Weiner, the television writer best known for creating the hit series Mad Men, shares his view on an extraordinary time in TV history: now.

He speaks about unprecedented creative opportunities in the TV business, the enormity of TV production along the bloated executive ranks in Hollywood. He addresses the increasing importance of international markets and the growing impact of services Netflix and Amazon.

He shares his views on consumer perception of advertising which he sees as very positive.

This 47-minute on-stage interview was conducted by Scott Ferber, CEO of Videology. It was taped at the company’s Full Frontal industry leadership event held earlier this month in New York.

For Mad Men, Weiner said he had hoped to find a single sponsor like American Express to limit advertising to a more PBS-style sponsorship. While that didn’t work out, he sees sponsorships versus conventional ad loads as a viable model for the future.

This video was produced by Videology. We are pleased to publish it on Beet.TV, courtesy of Videology. 

March 26 2017

22:58

Travel Joins Autos, Financial Services As Big Audience Targeting Categories: Experian’s Danaher

The travel industry vertical has joined automotive and financial services a top category for more precise consumer targeting and outcomes measurement via digital video. Nonetheless, there’s a still a lot of “heavy lifting” going on as brand marketers try to best identify their target audiences with first- and third-party data, according to Experian’s Brad Danaher.

During a break at the recent Beet.TV Leadership Summit titled Outcomes, presented by video marketing technology provider Eyeview, the Television Partnership Director for Experian shares his insights on product and service category success stories and what lies ahead.

Automotive, which is “a big TV category in general, is prime territory for consumer targeting and outcomes measurement, according to Danaher. “That’s been a huge success because even half a percent lift will drive thousands of extra cars sold, so that’s been a big win,” Danaher says in response to a question by Matt Prohaska of Prohaska Consulting.

Financial services, which has a lot of metrics inherent in the business, has been “a big category for us and interestingly, travel has been maybe not number three but it’s certainly significant,” Danaher explains.

Asked about the pricing model for using third-party targeting and measurement data, Danaher cites the usage model adopted by Experian and other third-party data providers. A big advantage is no major upfront commitment of budget.

“Since we’re measuring all of it we can see what works. And then they usually come back and buy more of what works. That usage model has really enabled a lot of people,” says Danaher.

What would he like to see 12 to 24 months from now in terms of industry progression on audience targeting and measurement? “The dream would be a cross-media campaign using an Experian segment in TV online and mobile,” he says.

“Right now there’s a lot of heavy lifting still” as brands seek the best data to define and target audiences. “Twelve months from now the ideal would be if the advertiser knows their metrics, they know what data to use and they know what they’re doing and it’s fast, smooth and efficient,” Danaher says.

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

22:41

Video Emerging As Driver Of Physical Store Traffic: Placed’s Shim

As measuring the outcomes of digital video ad campaigns gets more sophisticated, what excites Placed’s David Shim is video as a direct-response channel. The same advances in measurement can only improve the performance of traditional linear television.

In this interview at the recent Beet.TV Leadership Summit titled Outcomes, presented by video marketing technology provider Eyeview, Shim offers his views on video and advanced TV as the industry moves beyond branding-only metrics.

“I’m excited about video becoming a DR channel,” says Shim, who founded Placed in 2011. “Being able to not just measure views, clicks and engagement but actually drive that into offline visitation.”

There are similarities in the shift from display to search, according to Shim. “I think you can see the same thing with video because the impact that it has and the ability it has to actually drive people into the physical store,” he says.

This is a consideration higher than someone clicking on an ad, visiting a site and purchasing something. As measurement techniques get better and better, video will emerge as a very strong player.

“Video is going that way, especially with partners like Eyeview to close that loop. It’s going to be incredibly huge because people are going to move dollars accordingly,” says Shim.

Asked by Joanna O’Connell, Chief Marketing Officer at MediaMath, to describe the state of advanced TV, Shim says the hard part is limited reach. Nonetheless, he sees more and more advertisers “jumping in and saying this is something I want to explore, this is something I want to test against.”

An attendant expectation will be improved targeting via linear TV. “I expect the market to continue to grow and measurement to continue to be important, but I expect it to also help change the way linear is approached,” Shim says.

When it comes to reach, there are parallels to the digital world. Asked to name the best platforms for brands, Shim points to those with the most scale. “If you’ve got a small set of users or reach it becomes difficult to optimize because you over optimize and the reach is diminished,” he says.

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

22:26

Solving Foundational Capabilities Paves The Way For Best Use Of Data: Disney ABC’s Dean

VIEQUES, PR – Disney ABC Television Group wants to expand the definition of “data” beyond the delivery of impressions or selecting shows, dayparts and units. It’s part of a holistic approach that leverages the company’s immense store of information across all of its assets.

This requires looking beyond audience targets and encompassing data from set-top boxes, ad servers, social media and other sources, according to Mike Dean, VP of Programmatic & Date-Driven Sales.

In other words, “How can we bring all of these things together and then really start at the beginning of an advertiser’s journey,” says Dean. “Be smarter about planning, consumption across platforms, how that rolls up.”

The next method for using data is for delivery and optimization, getting down to which impressions and units are the right match for specific objectives, Dean says in an interview at the recent Beet.TV Executive Retreat titled Video Everywhere! The Transformation of Media & Advertising.

“Lastly, how do we tie that all together with data to prove attribution, to prove ROI and feed those insights back into the planning process so that we’re going full circle,” Dean adds.

The company’s initial focus is on the power of content, multiplatform television and scale. Then it layers on Disney data—what it knows about users, viewers and fans and how they engage across mobile, media properties in in places like parks and theaters.

“When we bring those together, it gives us the ability to improve a marketer’s target, have a better understand of our viewers,” says Dean.

Given market complexity, fragmented platforms and silos, it’s a challenge to achieve a holistic view.

“The first thing we have to solve for is those foundational capabilities,” he adds. “It’s not the things that are going to make headlines, but it’s the roll up your sleeves kind of work that we must do to set the foundation for the future.”

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

22:18

Ooyala’s Braley Connects Content To Advertisers For Broadcasters

VIEQUES, PR – It is now more than two years since Ooyala, a video advertising services provider, acquired peer Videoplaza, with its strong client base in the European broadcasting segment.

The combined entity, now also part of Australia telco Telstra’s family, has spent the time since merging its respective strengths, and is now ready to go at a new product area.

In this video interview with Beet.TV, Ooyala ad platforms GM Scott Braley explains: “One of the biggest areas of focus for us over the last couple of years, since the acquisition of the Videoplaza business by Ooayla, has been thinking of ways to bring together the direct-sold business that broadcasters have traditionally relied on as a monetisation channel with programmatic.

“We’ve just recently culminated two years of development with a holistic decisioning engine, giving broadcasters a centralised tool to consider inventory allocation across both of those channels dynamically, with lots of flexibility and configurability.

“The next big thing that we’re tackling is the integration of content analytics with advertising, really understanding … how to think about content and the different users you’ve got and how that translates to advertising on the revenue side.”

Braley describes it as a consulting service that helps broadcasters understand how to use new data, specifically the relationship that programming has on advertising offerings and effectiveness.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

22:16

Reach And Creative Drive Ad ROI: Facebook’s Slotwiner

It made $28.6bn from advertising last year alone – clearly that business works for Facebook. But what advertising works for Facebook’s customers?

That is a question Facebook advertising research director Daniel Slotwiner has been asking himself lately.

Speaking at a Beet.TV leadership summit, he pondered: “How do you measure the value of video?”

“We’re thinking a lot about what’s different about the video we provide versus other formats,” Slotwiner added. “We’re spending a lot of time trying to understand the relationship between outcomes and duration, how to evaluate creative, what’s the relationship between certain types of outcomes, and what’s the relationship between the formats.”

And Slotwiner has come to a conclusion. “The biggest levers for value and ROI are reach and creative,” he declared.

Facebook certainly boasts reach. Last quarter, it claimed a daily active user (DAU) metric of 1.23bn – almost a sixth of the global population.

But Slotwiner says times are changing. “Reach was easy to achieve on TV 30 years ago,” he said. “It’s still possible to reach as many people, for sure – but you have to do it in a lot of different places.”

He was interviewed by MediaMath chief marketing officer Joanna O’Connell.

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

March 24 2017

15:00
A New WordPress App Update, Designed for the iPad
14:48
3 ways to spot a bad statistic | Mona Chalabi
Polls that predict political candidates' chances to two decimal places are a problem. But we shouldn't count out stats altogether ... instead, we should learn to look behind them. In this delightful, hilarious talk, data journalist Mona Chalabi shares handy tips to help question, interpret and truly understand what the numbers are saying.

March 23 2017

20:39

605’s Dolan: Lots Of Moving Pieces To Audience Targeting And Measurement

VIEQUES, PR – Although consumers may perceive video content as being no different than traditional linear television programming, programmers and providers should try to look at things across a comprehensive ecosystem. The key word is “try.”

This not to say that a common sales and measurement currency is in sight and, in fact, it seems that more pieces are constantly being added to the puzzle, according to Kristin Dolan, the CEO of data and analytics firm 605 and former longtime executive at MVPD giant Cablevision Systems.

“Coming from the business side of it, we still see there’s very specific differences between linear television versus a YouTube view,” Dolan says in this interview at the recent Beet.TV Executive Retreat titled Video Everywhere! The Transformation of Media & Advertising. “But as you watch children and the changing consumption habits of consumers, I don’t know that’s it’s as clearly defined anymore.”

This is because people watch all sorts of video content right alongside traditional serialized content or traditional sports and news. “So I think for the consumer it’s becoming more blurred, but for the industry we have to kind of get there and figure out who we are and what we do,” Dolan says in response to a question from Matt Spiegel of MediaLink.

What’s undisputed is the importance of being able to sell to and measure the impact on an audience at the household level as opposed to census level, “Because of the differences that are occurring in consumption of traditional television along with the insurgence of digital video,” she adds.

Dolan mentions new questions that arise about the potential valuation of things like earned media and sponsorships, where the visibility of an advertiser’s logo within the video stream also needs to be measured. “You have all the pieces but it’s sort of a mishegoss of different things it’s a bit of a mess but it’s all there,” says Dolan, invoking the Yiddish term for craziness.

She also touches on issues like how long cable and satellite TV operators will be able to continue to extract subscription fees from consumers in addition to revenue from affiliates and advertisers when network TV content is no longer as “exclusive” as it once was.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

16:31
Unlimited Premium Themes Now Included in the Premium Plan
15:31

NBCU’s Optimization Offerings No Longer Limited To Upfront Or Scatter Buys, Says Colella

VIEQUES, PR – It would be an understatement to say that NBCUniversal is going all in on audience targeting and guarantees. Not only has the media giant committed to making up to $1 billion of its inventory available for guarantees in this year’s Upfront season, it’s switched all of its optimization offerings to “always on,” says Denise Colella, SVP of Advanced Advertising Products & Strategy.

“That’s really exciting because we’ve been investing in our data capabilities and our audience platforms for a couple of years now and we’re ready to put our money where our mouth is,” Colella explains in an interview at the recent Beet.TV Executive Retreat titled Video Everywhere! The Transformation of Media & Advertising.

In the past, NBCU’s Audience Targeting Platform was available only during the Upfront period, while its NBCUx programmatic linear product was limited to buys in the scatter market. “Now that we’re seeing the great results that we’re getting and we’ve invested in the ability to scale these, we’re turning all of our data products always on,” Colella says.

Part of the momentum comes from advertisers, which are increasingly investing in their own data infrastructures to enhance TV audience targeting. NBCU has a unique position in that advertisers can use their own data and demand-side platforms to buy programmatically on NBCU’s platform, according to Colella.

“At this point in time we know who is consuming the content,” she says. “The value proposition is really to speak to consumers individually and make sure we’re providing the best return on ad spend for our advertisers.”

Given its plethora of properties—ranging from entertainment to sports, news to Hispanic brands—NBCU has no shortage of insights into its more than 100 million unique visitors.

“We know a lot about our consumers, whether it’s what platform are they consuming our content, when are they booking golf games with our properties like Golf Now, what movies are they watching on Fandango and when are they going to the theatre,” Colella says.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

15:19
Who would the rest of the world vote for in your country's election? | Simon Anholt
To make the world work, we need leaders who consider the needs of every man, woman, child and animal on the planet -- not just their own voters. With the Global Vote, an online platform that lets anybody, anywhere in the world vote in the election of any country on earth, policy advisor Simon Anholt hopes to fill the gap between the few people who elect the world's most powerful leaders ... and the rest of us.
10:22

Simulmedia’s Siegel Fancies Self-Serve Ad Planning Model

VIEQUES, PR — The company started by the founder of Tacoda and Real Media to help advertisers data-target their TV ad buys now plans to give its customers more hands-on control.

Simulmedia, founded by Dave Morgan, is the latest video ad-tech company to try moving more of its technology to a self-service model.

In this video interview with Beet.TV, the company’s sales VP Marc Siegel says: “We have some really cool things coming out in the next three to six months.

“Our platform, VAMOS, Video Advertising Marketing Operating System, is really going to be something that’s really going to be developed to put in the hands off our key customers.

“(It will) really allow them to use it more as a self-service tool, allow them to be able really to predict and plan on a people basis against really important custom target segments that they’ve built that we can ingest and that we can help to grow their business.”

In the last few months, we have covered moves by Time Inc’s Viant and AOL’s ONE to acquire and launch online software platforms as services that let ad buyers control more of the process.

The move from managed service to self-service is an emerging trend in ad-tech right now. Venture investment is turning away from business models where revenue is linked to ad spend itself, as VCs prefer the certainty of guaranteed recurring revenue and the efficiency of empowering customers to do the heavy lifting some ad-tech providers do behind the scenes.

Simulmedia’s tools give ad buyers access to ad inventory across nine MVPDs and 80 networks.

VAMOS’ Insights section is a self-service online portal through which clients can access reporting for their campaigns, request future campaign options, and receive fast and interactive results.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

March 22 2017

22:34

How FreeWheel Treats Two Customer Segments Differently

VIEQUES, PR — FreeWheel’s video advertising server software is used by both broadcast and non-broadcast media companies alike, to better tap in to demand for their valuable ad space.

But those two segments have very different rationales for wanting ad-tech, so FreeWheel approaches each differently.

That is according to FreeWheel publisher partnerships VP Julie Van Ullen, who sat down with Beet.TV for this video interview.

“More recently, we’ve broadened our scope to include media companies and portals who are augmenting their strategy for monetisation to include video creation or even outstream units,” Van Ullen says.

“(We deliver) the SSP that is built in to the ad server (for broadcasters) … in a very different way than we’re addressing the market of media…”

  • Programmer: “In the programmer segment, the most important thing for these folks is control.” Van Ullen says that includes respecting given competing advertisers space within pre-, mid- or post-roll ads, plus compliance and rights management.
  • Media: “When it comes to the other side of the house … it’s much more about monetisation on the media and portals segment. This isn’t just another demand play. We’ve seen the communisation of this inventory have a negative effect on the marketplace as a whole. We want that not to happen here. Our SSP exposes … the data that allows the publisher to value their inventory appropriately.”

According to FreeWheel’s latest Video Monetization Report for 2016, last year video companies focused on improving user experience, big news and sports events drove ad views, while more ad buying went automated.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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